The perfect storm and old man in the sea comparison essays

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The perfect storm and old man in the sea comparison essays

The commitment to sailing out farther into the sea where the big fish promise to be, testifies to the depth of a fisherman's pride. Santiago, a character in The Old Man In The Sea, does this with determination to change his "ill luck." In The Perfect Storm, the crew of the Andrea Gail does the same in order to make some quick cash with some hard working. In both books, obstacles unlike no other face each man, a moment of truth for all.
Santiago, an old wise man, could definitely be considered a "Jonah." He has faced ill luck for eighty-four days by not catching a single fish and becoming the laughing-stock of his insignificant village. His prize Marlin was destroyed by sharks and Santiago blames it on his exaggerated pride. On board the Andrea Gail, Billy Tyne also covets to go further into the sea, (the Flemish Cap) to increase his fish stock and earn a rewarding paycheck. His crew finds a great amount of fish but in the end loses it all to three combined storms: Hurricane Grace, the Sable Island Storm, and a Canadian high. Billy Tyne and Santiago share the same "exaggerated pride," which in the end brings them down. When the crew works "twenty hours a day for two or three weeks straight," they "fall into their bunks for the long steam back." (P.58 The Perfect Storm) This means the storms caught the crew off guard and ill luck led the way to their fatal deaths. However, before Santiago was no more, he taught many lessons to Manolin, and the Andrea Gail crew to the world.
By sailing right into the middle of three storms, Billy Tyne's ignorance and anxiety to get home and collect his money was overpowering him. Santiago was over powered in his mind to catch at least one fish and make his village stop laughing. These driving forces are what led to tragic endings in both novels. Everyone on the Andrea Gail is never heard from again and Santiago lost his Ma